Food, Photography and Lifestyle Blog

Hong Kong as maybe not everyone expects it


Hong Kong keeps amazing me, even after 15 years here! where ever you go how many turns you make thats how many sights you can expect.

A lovely building, a old lady working hard collecting papers, a building almost collapsing, a pink building, a blue one, someone cutting a blister or corn on his foot on the streets with a hobby knife, a barber shop for HK$ 25 hair cuts, yes HK$ 25 hair cuts, I should have tried and would have if I had any hair on my head!

Here i show you some random images from my stroll today:

Here the Museum of Medical Sciences, website (with some amazing old pictures) : http://www.hkmms.org.hk/English/main.htm

Museum of Medical Sciences

Museum of Medical Sciences

Museum of Medical Sciences

Museum of Medical Sciences

Museum of Medical Sciences

Museum of Medical Sciences

Museum of Medical Sciences

Museum of Medical Sciences

The Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences, established in 1996, is an unique institution charting the historical development of medical sciences in Hong Kong. The Museum occupies 10,000 square feet, comprising 11 Exhibition Galleries, 1 Gallery for Tai Ping Shan View, 1 Library and 1 Lecture Room, each presents in a variety of ways to arouse interests and to help members of the community know more about health and diseases, including past conquests, current developments and future challenge of special relevance to Hong Kong. It also explores the interface between Chinese and Western medicine and encourage research in this area. It intends to serve both as an educational venue and to restore and conserve medical objects of historical value. As such, it is the first of its kind amongst medical museums in the world!

History

The Old Bacteriological institute, established in 1906, was the first purpose-built medical laboratory in Hong Kong, situated near to the site of Tai Ping Shan plague outbreak. Originally, there was the main building and two subsidiary blocks – one designed to accommodate the attendants, the other as an animal house containing stables. Over the years, the Institute played a significant role in the development of Hong Kong’s medical service. With time, its role changed as did its name, becoming the Pathological Institute. It continued to be used as a laboratory until the 1950’s. Ever since Government declared it a listed building, the Hong Kong College of Pathologists, knowing the building’s potential and the importance of public awareness of the history and development of medical science in this region, petitioned for its uses as a museum. The Hong Kong Government agreed, and the Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences was founded.

The Building

The building is a British architectural design, drawing references from the Edwardian period, and representing Hong Kong architecture in the first decade of the century. It was transformed to suit tropical conditions, with expansive balconies and well-placed windows to encourage cross-ventilation. The use of Chinese roof tiles is probably due to the sensitivity to the local materials and deference to the local culture. It is interesting to imagine that in order to encourage the creativity of the exploring pathologists, the architect’s impulse allowed a folly of obelisks to sprout forth from the top of the building corners in stoic formation.

Another Gem on my way today, the Young mens Christian Association (we all know that means YMCA…erh….thank you darling!)  a beauty of a building in HK I would say but all I can find is Chinese language only website info about this…..but what a nice building it is, and that in concrete jungle!

YMCA Sheung Wan

YMCA Sheung Wan

YMCA Sheung Wan

YMCA Sheung Wan

YMCA Sheung Wan

YMCA Sheung Wan

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One response

  1. Cool site, love the info.

    September 2, 2009 at 8:25 pm

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